Posted on

When will coins change to King Charles III?

Along with the rest of the UK, we were deeply saddened by the news of Queen Elizabeth II’s death on September 8th, aged 96. 

The Queen’s face is one that we all see daily. Her head takes pride of place on our stamps, banknotes, coins and medals. This has been the case since the start of her reign in 1956. 

During Elizabeth II’s reign, the UK transitioned into a decimal currency, and the switch came on Monday, February 15th 1971. Before the switch, it was customary for more than one monarch’s face to be on British coins, but they were all updated with the Queen’s head in time for decimalisation in 1971. 

There are 29 billion coins in circulation in the UK that picture Her Majesty’s head. The Royal Mint will no longer create new coins with her image, but it will take a while for us to start seeing King Charles III’s head on our coins. It could also take many years for the late Queen’s image to completely vanish from circulation. 

The first step will be for The King to work with The Royal Mint to approve a new design for coins and notes. The Chancellor and then the King will approve the final design. As part of a 300-year-old tradition, King Charles will face left on the new coins. Each time there is a new monarch, the direction of their head changes. The late Queen’s father, King George VI, faced left on coins before she took reign. 

Even though many significant changes will happen over the next few weeks and months, we don’t have to worry about invalid coins. Coins with the late Queen’s head on them will remain legal tender, and over time they will eventually be phased out.

However, it would be a good idea to check your coins as some of them could become very valuable in years to come. For example, the second most valuable Queen Elizabeth II coin is the mule gold proof Double Sovereign £2 coin with the wrong obverse. It is 22ct gold and was released in 1994 to celebrate 300 years of the Bank of England; it also has a unique reverse inspired by the original Britannia seal of the UK’s central bank.

Mr Jon White is a coin expert, and in an interview, he explained that this rare find has a current value of £5,000 as there are only 1,000 of them in circulation.

If you are interested in investing in Gold coins, we have a range of Gold sovereign coins on our website. If you’d like to have a chat about how to get started, drop us an email or give us a call, and we’ll be happy to help. 

Posted on

A short history of Gold

“The Golden Rule: He who has the gold makes the rules.”

Gold has always been viewed as one of the most precious metals throughout history. 

Gold is the only metal with a distinct golden colour and is also one of the rarest natural minerals.

Did you know that nearly all of the Gold on Earth came from the supernovae and neutron star collisions which resulted in an explosion creating atoms of Gold? Scientists believe that Gold buried itself deep into the Earth’s core during the creation of Earth, and geologists have even found rocks of Gold as old as 4 billion years.

Since Gold was so precious and rare, in around 550 BC, Gold started to be mined and used as a currency in Greece and the Middle East. Gold was used as a currency in many countries before paper money was created. When paper money was introduced, it was called the Gold Standard. The Gold Standard set a fixed price for Gold which determined its value. The paper money was linked directly to the Gold, and countries agreed to convert the paper money into a fixed amount of Gold. 

Still to this day, Gold is one of the world’s most useful and highly valued metals. Even though it is technically a heavy metal, it’s very soft and can be moulded and shaped into jewellery. Gold is also used for Olympic medals and trophies; it can even be used to conduct electricity. 

Today many people, including governments, hold investments in Gold. Buying Gold as an asset can help protect your wealth in the long term and be an excellent addition to your investment portfolio. Gold can never be destroyed and can not be altered or hacked like some investments in the digital world. 

At J Blundells & Sons, we’ve been trading Gold since 1839. We’re a family-run business based in the heart of London’s famous jewellery district, Hatton Garden. If you are interested in buying Gold, we’d love to help you take that first step. 

Posted on

How to sell unwanted gold and jewellery

It can be a daunting experience when you are trying to sell your unwanted gold, silver or any precious metal jewellery, so we have compiled a quick list for you to get best and fair price. 

  1. Understand what is your jewellery made of, for example is it gold, platinum, silver or palladium? You can use British hallmarks guide to ascertain metal and carat (fineness). You may use London assay office’s guide for this.
  2. Don’t be afraid of shopping around. It is best practice to call 2 to 3 gold buying shops to ask what they are paying per gram on that day. Precious metals trade live and the price paid changes everyday. Some shops make it easier for the customer by putting prices on their website. Generally, you can trust the shops that make information clear and transparent to you. When calling these shops ask them a few questions, for example “What are you paying for fine gold and 9 carat gold per gram today?” And “Are there any other charges when selling jewellery”
  3. Compare prices with a quick internet search, you can get live gold prices. As a rule of thumb, you should get between 90% to 97% percent of market price.
  4. Carry identity documents, usually shops would ask for a photo ID and proof of address.
  5. Be prepared for good news and bad news, because jewellery is made in different carats (fineness) it is not always easy to identify which carat jewellery is made of, especially for someone who is not in the trade. Also, depending on origin of jewellery, where trademark practices are not as stringent as UK, it may mean that an item has a 22-carat stamp but, instead it’s made of 20 or 21 carat. Or you may think that an item is 9 carat, and it actually is 14 carat or 18 carat, which means you would get more money back. Whichever the case a good gold buyer will talk you through the process of assaying your item. 

When selling jewellery, remember that buyer is only buying the precious metal content and hence would not pay for money invested in ‘making’ of the item or any stones, wires or enamel. 

We buy all precious metals and pay according to London fix. You can check our price on the website. There are no other hidden charges, and we give multiple payment options including same day bank transfers

And if you don’t want to part with your jewellery but need some money, you can always get a secured loan against it. Check out our pawnbroking and buyback services